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Women account for less than 5 percent of producers and engineers — but maybe not for long

Women are as visible as ever in music — between them, Taylor Swift, Beyoncé and Lady Gaga have sold over 22 million records since 2008. But look closer at the credits on those albums, and women’s names are few and far between. What about producing and engineering? Who’s guiding the sound and leading the recording process, and doing the work in the studio that takes the sound waves, electrical impulses and digitized bits of sonic information and shapes them into the music we hear? Those roles are almost all filled by men. Beyoncé was a producer on I Am … Sasha Fierce, but she is a rare specimen. By most estimates, women represent less than 5 percent of producers and engineers industry-wide.

"I think that’s generous," says Terri Winston, founder and executive director of Women’s Audio Mission, a nonprofit program in San Francisco dedicated to training women and girls in audio production. "To be honest, I think it’s a lot less than that." And historically this has been the case. Jessica Hopper, music adviser to public radio’s This American Life (and Scene contributor), says she wanted to dedicate some space to female producers in her book The Girls’ Guide to Rocking. But beyond a few names — Genya Ravan, who produced Dead Boys’ Young, Loud and Snotty; Susan Rogers, who engineered Purple Rain; and the British electronics pioneer Delia Derbyshire — she found that women amount to little more than a footnote.

"I wound up cutting that [out of] the book," Hopper says, "because there are so, so few."

So why the imbalance? There’s certainly sexism, but that alone doesn’t seem to explain the incredibly skewed numbers. Talk to some of the women who have worked as producers and engineers around Nashville, and there is no shortage of theories. But one thing they all know is that they don’t know — they don’t know why, exactly, there are so few women producing and engineering.

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http://www.nashvillescene.com/nashville/women-account-for-less-than-5-percent-of-producers-and-engineers-andmdash-but-maybe-not-for-long/Content?oid=1597594

did-you-kno:

Oprah Winfrey grew up in poverty, was raped at age 9 and 13, ran away from home, and gave birth at 14 to a son who died soon after, but still went on to become the world’s 1st African American billionairess. Source

did-you-kno:

Oprah Winfrey grew up in poverty, was raped at age 9 and 13, ran away from home, and gave birth at 14 to a son who died soon after, but still went on to become the world’s 1st African American billionairess. Source